Pee Wee Reese 1985 Autographed Perez Steele Postcard Encased Brooklyn
Pee Wee Reese 1985 Autographed Perez Steele Postcard Encased Brooklyn

Pee Wee Reese 1985 Autographed Perez Steele Postcard Encased Brooklyn

Regular price $89.99

Autographed Perez Steele Postcard Encased

Historic Autographs Company is going with something quite simple, yet extremely popular. Since their inception in the early 1980s, one of the most popular autograph mediums used to collect HOFers has been the Hall of Fame Art Postcards by Perez Steele. With so many collectors seeking authentic examples, Historic Autographs is releasing 2019 HA Steele Engravings. These works were created for The Perez-Steele Baseball Hall of Fame Art Postcards. Some of the originals are in the homes of collectors, some are archived at the National Baseball of Fame and Museum and a few reside in offices of Major League baseball clubs. Perez-Steele gives you the chance to bring the greatest ball players of all time from Cooperstown to your town with these beautiful full color postcards that measure 3 1/2” X 5 1/2” and feature paintings of the players enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Card backs feature player information and select career stats. Each of the postcards is numbered out of 10,000. The number of signed postcards are significantly even more rare. The Signed and Slabbed Postcards are authenticated by Beckett Authentication Service. https://www.beckett-authentication.com/verify-certificate

Harold Peter Henry "Pee Wee" Reese (July 23, 1918 – August 14, 1999) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as a shortstop for the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers from 1940 to 1958. A ten-time All Star, Reese contributed to seven National League championships for the Dodgers. In a 16-year major league career, Reese played in 2,166 games, accumulating 2,170 hits in 8,058 at bats for a .269 career batting average along with 126 home runs, 885 runs batted in and an on-base percentage of .366. He retired with a .962 fielding percentage. Other than his Navy time between 1943 and 1945, Reese had no breaks in service and played at least 140 games in every year from 1941 to 1956. Consistently productive, he scored at least 75 runs from 1942 through 1956 and amassed 1,338 lifetime, best of any Dodger. Though he never won a Most Valuable Player Award, eight times he ranked in the top ten of the Most Valuable Player Award balloting. He also was a home run threat during a time when shortstops seldom hit home runs. Reese amassed 252 stolen bases in a period when steals were not an integral part of the game. Defensively, he was an outstanding gloveman, leading National League shortstops four times in putouts and ranking in the top 10 all-time in putouts and double plays. One of the most popular players with both his teammates and the fans, the "Little Colonel" was the Dodgers' team captain, and he, not the manager, brought out the line-up card at the start of their games. Reese and Elston Howard have the dubious distinction of playing on the most losing World Series teams (six each). Reese's only World Series win as a player, with the Dodgers in the 1955 World Series, occurred against Howard's New York Yankees during Howard's first World Series. No other non-Yankee ballplayer has appeared in that many World Series for the same teamwas Reese is also famous for his support of his teammate Jackie Robinson, the first modern African American player in the major leagues, especially in Robinson's difficult first years. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1984.